Getting Back Into Work Pt.2 – Social Security

 In my last post, I told you all about receiving a part-time position with Amazon. So exciting right?! Yes, I was ecstatic because we in the disabled community know how difficult it is to find work. As, soon as I was offered the position I called Social Security directly because if you didn’t know whether you find a job on your own, or find work with the help of a state resource YOU MUST contact Social Security and let them know.

 

Doing this will help you to know what your next step should be, as well as give Social Security an idea of the course of action they will need to take as far as your benefits go. Because if you begin to work and you are making over what you get in government benefits those benefits can be terminated, or reduced. As previously stated, in the last blog post, depending on what type of benefits you receive you can be eligible to take part in a Trial Work Period. A trial work period is 9 months (doesn’t have to be consecutive, but over 60 months within a 5 year period) where you could work worry-free making as much as you want without it affecting the benefits you get. The catch here is that only applies to people receiving SSDI.

 

The main difference between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is the fact that SSDI is available   to  workers who have accumulated a sufficient number of work credits, while SSI disability benefits are available to low-income individuals who have either never worked or who haven’t earned enough work credits to qualify for SSDI. With SSI, if you work Social Security doesn’t count the first $65 of your earnings each month, plus one-half of the remaining earnings. They also apply the $20 general income exclusion to any unearned income you receive.

 

Speaking to Social Security will probably send you on a wild goose chase as they did me. Taking me on an unnecessary trip from the Ticket to Work program, to the Trial Work Period, and lastly ending with the local Vocational Rehab Services. Where they referred me to a Benefits Specialist. In the final installment, I’ll tell you my experience with Voc Rehab and the Benefits Specialist…stay tuned.

 

Citations:

Laurence, Bethany K. “What Is the Difference Between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and SSI?” www.disabilitysecrets.com, Nolo, 6 Apr. 2018, www.disabilitysecrets.com/page5-13.html.

 Securing Today and Tomorrow: 2017 Red Book, a Summary Guide to Employment Supports for Persons with Disabilities under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Programs. Social Security Administration, 2017.

 

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